Tags Posts tagged with "Texas Workforce Commission"

Texas Workforce Commission

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The Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) has awarded The Houston Launch Pad a $297,194 Self-Sufficiency Fund training grant. The Houston Launch Pad partnered with Almeda-Genoa Construction, Williams Brothers Construction and ISI Infrastructure Services to help 150 individuals transition into the workforce from either dependency on public assistance. The grant will help provide job training in carpentry, concrete finishing, construction and heavy equipment operator occupations. Grant funding from the Self-Sufficiency Fund will also assist in developing the technical education and learning environment that will lead to industry recognized certificates and credentials.

“These grants lead to skilled training and future job opportunities which expands our state’s workforce, benefiting our communities,” said state Sen. Borris L. Miles.

“This grant partnership delivers workforce solutions that will help improve workers’ job skills and is an impetus for job creation for our communities,” said state Rep. Shawn Thierry.

“Skills grants deliver customized training solutions that help Texas employers and workers succeed in the marketplace,” said TWC Chairman Andres Alcantar. “This investment builds not only employee skills, but the capabilities of our community colleges to the benefit of employers and the community. We are pleased to make this investment.”

The Self-Sufficiency Fund provides funding to eligible training providers including nonprofit 501(c)(3) community-based organizations, Texas public community or technical colleges or the Texas Engineering Extension Service. The Self-Sufficiency Fund pays for curriculum development, instructor fees and certifications, training materials, certain work-related expenses for trainees and some training equipment for the six targeted industry clusters, including construction, logistics and transportation.

A team of experts from TWC’s Office of Employer Initiatives provides technical assistance at no charge to help streamline Self-Sufficiency Fund project development. The Outreach and Project Development Consultants work directly with grant applicants and training providers, Workforce Development Boards and economic development partners throughout the development of the project to ensure that participants receive specific, customized training that is required for occupations. For more information, contact the Outreach and Project Development Consultants at 877-463-1777, customizedtraining.solutions@twc.state.tx.us or locate resources on the TWC’s Self-Sufficiency Fund webpage.

The Houston Launch Pad contact: Program Director Prentice Goods, 281-507-6742 or pdgoods11@yahoo.com.

 

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AUSTIN ⎯ The Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) recently announced the award of $1.03 million to support four new accelerated certificate or degree programs through its College Credit for Heroes (CCH) program, a statewide effort designed to maximize the award of college credit to veterans and service members for their military experience. TWC also announced a new partner school for CCH.

“The United States Military produces some of the brightest and most highly-skilled individuals in our workforce,” said Governor Greg Abbott. “The State of Texas’ investment in the College Credit for Heroes program creates an additional avenue for our veterans to further advance their skills and knowledge, creating greater opportunity to get a job they deserve. With the continued expansion of this program, Texas is ensuring that our veterans receive the college credit they have earned through service to our nation, and I applaud the Texas Workforce Commission for their efforts.”

“The College Credit for Heroes program allows skilled veterans and service members who dedicate their lives to our freedom to receive maximum credit for their valuable military service in order to more quickly transition to a Texas career,” said TWC Chairman Andres Alcantar. “I am proud these new partners join us as we work together to better serve the military heroes who choose to make Texas home.”

The addition of the new partner, Texas State University, demonstrates the continued momentum of the CCH program, which has grown to include a network of 48 university and community college partners who will help veterans connect with Texas employers.

“Texas employers are eager to hire skilled veterans, and we’re thrilled that College Credit for Heroes and its partnerships continue to grow,” said TWC Commissioner Representing Employers Ruth R. Hughs. “This program gives employers access to a more qualified workforce and recognizes the veteran’s training and experience gained during their service to our country.”

Veterans can set up an account at CollegeCreditforHeroes.org. Once registered, veterans can access an evaluation of their military experience and training, and request a military transcript from their branch of service to be sent to College Credit for Heroes staff for review. Veterans also may request that a transcript of awarded credits be sent to a Texas college of their choice. In addition, veterans can check the status of evaluations and/or transcript requests, participate in a live chat with a representative, and upload, view and download military evaluation results and related documents.

“By using the College Credit for Heroes website, veterans who are transitioning into civilian life can get a jump-start on their employment search,” said TWC Commissioner Representing Labor Julian Alvarez. “Veterans can learn about and receive college credit for their military skillsets, which can translate into new job opportunities or career advancements.”

New programs that received funding through College Credit for Heroes in 2017 include:

  • Dallas County Community College District (DCCCD)— $262, 977 is dedicated to developing the Veterans Education Transition program, designed to create an accelerated transition to a civilian career by replicating existing programs developed by Grayson College and Lee College. The selected programs include heating, ventilation, and air conditioning technology; welding; logistics, supply chain management; and manufacturing technology models to provide direct assessment and alignment for replication.
  • Houston Community College (HCC)— $472,687 is dedicated to developing the Veterans Academy for veterans and service members to capitalize on prior military experiences, translating skills, training and experiences into academic credit and gainful workforce employment opportunities within Texas. The Veteran Academy will use a “fast-track” streamlined model that targets two “credit for prior learning” pathways consisting of Transcript Evaluation for College Credit and Conversion of Continuing Education Contact Hours to College Credit in healthcare, information technology, transportation and logistics.
  • Lee College— $145,457 is dedicated to establishing an accelerated emergency medical technician (EMT) program. The school will replicate fast track curriculum based on the work done by Temple College to establish a non-credit accelerated program. Veterans who received emergency medical training while serving in the military will have the opportunity to gain credit for prior learning experience and credit by exam for their military coursework and be eligible to receive credit for basic EMT certification (Level 1) and parts of advanced EMT (AEMT) certification (Level 2) and paramedic certification (Level 3).
  • Texas State University (TSU)— $145,495 is dedicated to creating and implementing the Accelerate TXState project by developing various online prior learning assessment (PLA) curriculum. As a result, veterans and service members will have access to accelerated learning for employment areas that include athletics, business, business with computer information systems, criminal justice, engineering technology, geography information systems, health care administration, human resource development, occupational therapy, real estate, and social services. PLA will be used to accelerate the veterans’ ability to earn up to 30 hours of college credit for non-collegiate training and/or 24 hours of work-life learning, which will be applied towards a Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences.

About College Credit for Heroes

College Credit for Heroes (CCH) was authorized during the 82nd legislative session under SB 1736 and launched in 2011. More than 85,000 veterans have created accounts through the CCH website and 27,000 veterans have received evaluations. CCH evaluations have recommended an average of 25 credit hours per veteran. Texas colleges and universities are awarding an average of 16 credit hours per CCH evaluation.

For more information or to register for the program, visit the College Credit for Heroes website. For more information on workforce programs available for Texas veterans, visit the veterans resource page on the TWC website.

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AUSTIN ⎯ The Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) has awarded South Texas College a $223,109 a Jobs and Education for Texans (JET) grant. The grant will help the school district purchase and install equipment to provide 150 students with training for careers in the medical profession as licensed practical and vocational nurses.

“This partnership with South Texas College will focus on medical training and education to prepare our future workforce and meet employers’ demands for skilled labor,” said TWC Commissioner Representing Employers Ruth R. Hughs. “We are pleased to present this grant which provides training equipment to create new opportunities in the Lower Rio Grande Valley Texas area.”

TWC recently awarded 25 grants totaling $4,986,000 to public community and technical colleges and independent school districts for programs that focus on supporting new, emerging industries or high-demand occupations through the JET grant program.

The JET program provides funding for equipment to eligible educational institutions for the purpose of developing career and technical education courses and may include courses offering dual-credit and technical education programs. Equipment funded through JET grants must be used to train students for jobs in high-demand occupations.

Eligible educational institutions can apply for the next phase of JET funding through a competitive grant process. TWC has issued a Request for Proposals (RFP) solicitation that provides information and instruction on how to submit a proposal packet. Go to the JET Grant Program webpage to access the RFP Solicitation.

 

The Texas Workforce Commission is a state agency dedicated to helping Texas employers, workers and communities prosper economically. For details on TWC and the services it offers in coordination with its network of local workforce development boards, call 512-463-8942 or visit www.texasworkforce.org. To receive notifications about TWC programs and services subscribe to our email updates.

Texas Workforce Commission  512-463-8942  www.texasworkforce.org  Equal Opportunity Employer/Program
Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities.
Relay Texas: 800-735-2988 (TDD) or 711 (Voice)

 

 

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National Oilwell Varco (NOV) Grant Prideco has partnered with Blinn College to provide job training using a $820,365 Skills Development Fund grant from the Texas Workforce Commission (TWC). The grant will benefit workers in the Brazos Valley Texas area.

“The partnership between NOV Grant Prideco and Blinn College on this Skills Development Fund grant will benefit both the local community and its workforce,” said TWC Commissioner Representing Labor Julian Alvarez. “Our labor force is among the most talented and skilled in the world, and we continue to seek and implement strategies to improve the skills of Texas workers.”

This grant will be used to provide customized training to 395 new and incumbent workers for industry-related topics with focused instruction on manufacturing skills. Trainees will include welders, electricians and equipment operators. Upon completion of training, the workers will receive an average wage of $19.27.

Since its inception in 1996, the Skills Development Fund grants have created or upgraded more than 342,428 jobs throughout Texas. The grants have assisted 4,238 employers with their customized training needs. The Legislature allocated $48.5 million to the Skills Development Fund for the 2016-17 biennium. Employers seeking more information about the Skills Development Fund may visit the TWC website at www.texasworkforce.org/skills.

 

Texas Economy Adds 9,500 Jobs in March

AUSTIN — The Texas economy expanded in March with the addition of 9,500 seasonally adjusted nonfarm jobs. Texas’ seasonally adjusted unemployment rate increased to 5.0 percent in March, up slightly from 4.9 percent in February.

“Texas employers continue to boost the diverse Texas economy by adding jobs, including 249,000 over the year,” said Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) Chairman Andres Alcantar. “Texans continue to have a range of workforce opportunities created by our innovative Texas employers, and I encourage job seekers and students to explore these opportunities with local workforce boards around the state.”

Employment in the Professional and Business Services industry recorded the largest private-industry gain over the month with 13,200 jobs added. Mining and Logging employment grew by 4,800 jobs in March and Construction employment expanded by 4,000 jobs.

“Texas employers continue to keep our state competitive with an overall private-sector annual job growth of 210,500 with 7,000 jobs added in March, said TWC Commissioner Representing Employer Ruth R. Hughs. “When Texas employers prosper, Texans prosper, and we want to ensure they have the resources they need to start, grow and thrive their businesses right here at home.”

The Amarillo Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) recorded the month’s lowest unemployment rate among Texas MSAs with a non-seasonally adjusted rate of 3.5 percent, followed by the College Station-Bryan and Austin-Round Rock MSAs with a rate of 3.6 percent. The Lubbock and Midland MSAs each registered a rate of 4.0 percent for March.

“Texas workers have much to offer and there are resources available to help them find the perfect occupational fit, I encourage all job seekers to contact their local Workforce Solutions office for assistance with job training and placement,” said TWC Commissioner Representing Labor Julian Alvarez.

An audio download with comments from Chairman Alcantar on the latest labor market data is available on the TWC press release page. Employment estimates released by TWC are produced in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics. All estimates are subject to revision. To access this and more employment data, visit tracer2.com.

The Texas Labor Market & Career Information Data for April is scheduled to be released on Friday, May 19, 2017 at 9:00 a.m. (CDT).

Civilian Labor Force Estimates for Texas Metropolitan Statistical Areas Not Seasonally Adjusted (In Thousands)
  March 2017 February 2017 March 2016
  C.L.F Emp. Unemp. Rate C.L.F Emp. Unemp. Rate C.L.F Emp. Unemp. Rate
United States 159,912.0 152,628.0 7,284.0 4.6 159,482.0 151,594.0 7,887.0 4.9 158,854.0 150,738.0 8,116.0 5.1
  Texas 13,513.7 12,838.1 675.6 5.0 13,471.3 12,777.8 693.5 5.1 13,239.7 12,648.9 590.8 4.5
  Abilene 75.0 71.9 3.2 4.2 75.0 71.7 3.3 4.4 74.6 71.7 2.9 3.9
  Amarillo 133.7 129.0 4.7 3.5 133.3 128.5 4.8 3.6 131.7 127.8 3.9 3.0
  Austin-Round Rock 1,137.3 1,096.1 41.3 3.6 1,128.9 1,086.9 42.0 3.7 1,102.4 1,067.9 34.4 3.1
  Beaumont-Port Arthur 175.1 161.3 13.8 7.9 176.1 161.9 14.3 8.1 174.5 163.2 11.3 6.5
  Brownsville-Harlingen 169.4 156.0 13.4 7.9 168.8 154.8 14.0 8.3 165.9 154.3 11.6 7.0
  College Station-Bryan 129.6 124.9 4.7 3.6 129.4 124.5 4.9 3.8 126.7 122.4 4.3 3.4
  Corpus Christi 209.9 196.1 13.8 6.6 208.6 194.4 14.2 6.8 206.8 194.9 11.9 5.8
  Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington 3,777.3 3,616.0 161.3 4.3 3,767.7 3,604.7 163.0 4.3 3,645.9 3,507.0 138.9 3.8
  Dallas-Plano-Irving MD 2,549.4 2,441.7 107.7 4.2 2,544.8 2,435.9 108.9 4.3 2,453.1 2,361.6 91.5 3.7
  Fort Worth-Arlington MD 1,227.9 1,174.3 53.6 4.4 1,222.9 1,168.8 54.1 4.4 1,192.8 1,145.3 47.4 4.0
  El Paso 358.6 339.5 19.1 5.3 359.3 339.6 19.7 5.5 348.3 331.5 16.8 4.8
  Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land 3,327.9 3,137.8 190.0 5.7 3,322.3 3,125.7 196.6 5.9 3,281.9 3,120.2 161.7 4.9
  Killeen-Temple 178.8 170.3 8.5 4.8 178.7 169.9 8.8 4.9 174.0 166.6 7.5 4.3
  Laredo 115.1 109.3 5.8 5.0 115.1 109.1 6.0 5.2 112.9 107.3 5.6 4.9
  Longview 98.3 92.1 6.2 6.3 98.3 91.7 6.5 6.6 99.2 93.8 5.5 5.5
  Lubbock 161.2 154.8 6.4 4.0 160.3 154.4 5.9 3.7 158.5 153.3 5.2 3.3
  McAllen-Edinburg-Mission 344.3 315.1 29.2 8.5 343.5 313.2 30.4 8.8 336.6 310.7 25.8 7.7
  Midland 86.8 83.4 3.5 4.0 87.2 83.5 3.7 4.2 87.9 84.0 3.9 4.4
  Odessa 75.2 71.0 4.2 5.6 75.7 71.3 4.4 5.8 76.6 71.7 4.9 6.4
  San Angelo 54.6 52.1 2.5 4.5 54.4 51.8 2.5 4.6 55.5 53.0 2.5 4.5
  San Antonio-New Braunfels 1,155.6 1,108.7 46.9 4.1 1,151.1 1,102.9 48.3 4.2 1,129.7 1,088.6 41.1 3.6
  Sherman-Denison 61.8 59.3 2.6 4.2 61.7 59.1 2.6 4.3 60.3 57.9 2.4 3.9
  Texarkana 65.3 62.1 3.2 4.8 64.9 61.5 3.4 5.3 65.2 62.4 2.8 4.3
  Tyler 107.1 102.1 5.0 4.7 107.0 101.9 5.1 4.8 104.3 99.8 4.5 4.3
  Victoria 46.8 44.2 2.6 5.6 47.1 44.4 2.8 5.9 47.3 44.9 2.4 5.1
  Waco 123.5 118.1 5.4 4.3 123.3 117.8 5.5 4.5 121.1 116.4 4.7 3.9
  Wichita Falls 64.0 61.1 2.9 4.5 63.7 60.7 3.0 4.6 64.5 61.6 2.9 4.5

TEXAS NONAGRICULTURAL WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT SEASONALLY ADJUSTED
INDUSTRY TITLE Mar 2017* Feb 2017 Mar 2016 Feb ’17 to Mar ’17 Mar ’16 to Mar ’17
Absolute Change Percent Change Absolute Change Percent Change
Total Nonagricultural 12,215,100 12,205,600 11,966,100 9,500 0.1 249,000 2.1
Total Private 10,268,100 10,261,100 10,057,600 7,000 0.1 210,500 2.1
Goods Producing 1,799,400 1,788,900 1,780,300 10,500 0.6 19,100 1.1
Mining and Logging 227,100 222,300 231,400 4,800 2.2 -4,300 -1.9
Construction 714,300 710,300 695,400 4,000 0.6 18,900 2.7
Manufacturing 858,000 856,300 853,500 1,700 0.2 4,500 0.5
Service Providing 10,415,700 10,416,700 10,185,800 -1,000 0.0 229,900 2.3
Trade, Transportation, and Utilities 2,441,700 2,447,200 2,414,200 -5,500 -0.2 27,500 1.1
Information 196,800 196,600 201,500 200 0.1 -4,700 -2.3
Financial Activities 745,700 742,900 726,800 2,800 0.4 18,900 2.6
Professional and Business Services 1,672,200 1,659,000 1,613,700 13,200 0.8 58,500 3.6
Education and Health Services 1,666,500 1,668,900 1,618,200 -2,400 -0.1 48,300 3.0
Leisure and Hospitality 1,313,200 1,325,500 1,280,300 -12,300 -0.9 32,900 2.6
Other Services 432,600 432,100 422,600 500 0.1 10,000 2.4
Government 1,947,000 1,944,500 1,908,500 2,500 0.1 38,500 2.0

AUSTIN ⎯ Texas employers expanded their payrolls in January with the addition of 51,300 seasonally adjusted nonfarm jobs. Texas’ seasonally adjusted unemployment rate remained unchanged at 4.8 percent.

“Texas employers and our talented workforce started 2017 on a high note with the addition of 51,300 jobs in January,” said Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) Chairman Andres Alcantar. “Employers in a diverse range of industries have added 225,300 jobs over the year, a reflection of the many competitive advantages Texas offers to employers, including a strong business climate and an expanding and highly skilled workforce.”

The Professional and Business Services industry recorded the largest private-industry employment gain over the month with 14,000 jobs added. Trade, Transportation, and Utilities employment grew by 8,100 jobs in January, and Manufacturing employment expanded by 7,300 jobs.

“Private-sector employment was strong over the year with an increase in overall jobs of 183,100, and 45,900 jobs added in January,” said TWC Commissioner Representing Employers Ruth R. Hughs. “Texas employers continue to strengthen the job market by expanding employment and training opportunities.”

The Amarillo and Lubbock Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSA) recorded the month’s lowest unemployment rate among Texas MSAs with a non-seasonally adjusted rate of 3.4 percent, followed by the Austin-Round Rock MSA with a rate of 3.5 percent for January.

“Our economy continues to offer many diverse opportunities to job seekers,” said TWC Commissioner Representing Labor Julian Alvarez. “I encourage all job seekers to contact their local Workforce Solutions office for assistance with job training, placement and other specialized employment services.”

An audio download with comments from Commissioner Hughs on the latest labor market data is available on the TWC press release page. Employment estimates released by TWC are produced in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics. All estimates are subject to revision. To access this and more employment data, visit tracer2.com.

Civilian Labor Force Estimates for Texas Metropolitan Statistical Areas

Not Seasonally Adjusted (In Thousands)

  January 2017 December 2016 January 2016
  C.L.F. Emp.  Unemp. Rate C.L.F. Emp.  Unemp. Rate C.L.F. Emp.  Unemp. Rate
  United States 158,676.0 150,527.0 8,149.0 5.1 158,968.0 151,798.0 7,170.0 4.5 157,347.0 149,037.0 8,309.0 5.3
  Texas 13,358.0 12,697.1 660.9 4.9 13,353.3 12,747.3 606.0 4.5 13,113.0 12,521.5 591.5 4.5
  Abilene 74.1 71.0 3.1 4.2 74.4 71.5 2.8 3.8 74.2 71.3 2.9 3.9
  Amarillo 131.9 127.5 4.4 3.4 131.7 127.6 4.1 3.1 130.2 126.2 4.0 3.1
  Austin-Round Rock 1,122.5 1,083.5 39.0 3.5 1,120.1 1,084.6 35.5 3.2 1,088.5 1,053.2 35.3 3.2
  Beaumont-Port Arthur 175.3 160.9 14.4 8.2 173.7 160.8 13.0 7.5 174.9 162.9 12.0 6.9
  Brownsville-Harlingen 167.8 154.2 13.6 8.1 166.5 154.3 12.2 7.4 164.0 152.2 11.8 7.2
  College Station-Bryan 127.1 122.5 4.7 3.7 126.6 122.3 4.3 3.4 124.3 119.9 4.3 3.5
  Corpus Christi 205.9 191.8 14.1 6.8 206.0 193.2 12.8 6.2 203.9 192.2 11.7 5.8
  Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington 3,742.5 3,591.6 150.9 4.0 3,732.6 3,594.6 138.0 3.7 3,616.3 3,476.1 140.2 3.9
  Dallas-Plano-Irving MD 2,527.1 2,426.6 100.5 4.0 2,520.6 2,429.0 91.6 3.6 2,433.4 2,341.1 92.3 3.8
  Fort Worth-Arlington MD 1,215.4 1,165.0 50.4 4.2 1,212.0 1,165.6 46.4 3.8 1,182.9 1,135.0 47.9 4.0
  El Paso 354.6 336.1 18.5 5.2 354.3 337.3 17.0 4.8 346.5 329.2 17.3 5.0
  Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land 3,292.0 3,102.3 189.6 5.8 3,299.6 3,125.0 174.6 5.3 3,263.5 3,103.7 159.8 4.9
  Killeen-Temple 177.6 169.3 8.3 4.7 177.1 169.6 7.5 4.3 172.6 165.0 7.6 4.4
  Laredo 114.6 108.9 5.8 5.0 114.6 109.4 5.2 4.6 112.2 106.6 5.5 4.9
  Longview 97.8 91.4 6.4 6.6 97.7 92.0 5.8 5.9 98.4 93.0 5.4 5.5
  Lubbock 157.9 152.5 5.4 3.4 158.1 153.1 5.0 3.2 154.7 149.5 5.2 3.4
  McAllen-Edinburg-Mission 340.6 309.8 30.8 9.0 339.9 311.9 28.0 8.2 332.5 305.1 27.4 8.2
  Midland 86.4 82.8 3.6 4.1 86.2 82.8 3.4 4.0 88.7 85.2 3.5 4.0
  Odessa 75.0 70.6 4.4 5.8 74.9 70.7 4.2 5.6 77.1 72.8 4.3 5.6
  San Angelo 53.9 51.4 2.5 4.6 54.4 52.1 2.3 4.2 54.6 52.3 2.3 4.2
  San Antonio-New Braunfels 1,141.2 1,096.2 44.9 3.9 1,143.1 1,101.5 41.6 3.6 1,116.3 1,074.9 41.4 3.7
  Sherman-Denison 61.1 58.6 2.4 4.0 61.0 58.8 2.2 3.6 59.7 57.3 2.4 4.0
  Texarkana 64.2 60.9 3.3 5.1 64.6 61.6 3.0 4.6 64.7 61.6 3.1 4.8
  Tyler 105.5 100.5 5.0 4.7 106.8 102.2 4.6 4.3 103.3 98.9 4.5 4.3
  Victoria 47.0 44.2 2.7 5.8 47.1 44.7 2.5 5.2 47.5 45.3 2.2 4.6
  Waco 122.1 117.0 5.1 4.2 122.3 117.6 4.7 3.8 119.9 115.2 4.7 3.9
  Wichita Falls 63.3 60.4 2.9 4.5 63.2 60.6 2.6 4.2 63.9 61.0 2.9 4.5
                         

TEXAS NONAGRICULTURAL WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT

SEASONALLY ADJUSTED

INDUSTRY TITLE Jan 2017* Dec 2016 Jan 2016 Dec ’16 to Jan ’17 Jan ’16 to Jan ’17  
Absolute Change Percent Change Absolute Change Percent Change  
 
Total Nonagricultural 12,189,100  12,137,800  11,963,800  51,300  0.4    225,300  1.9       
Total Private 10,243,300  10,197,400  10,060,200  45,900  0.5    183,100  1.8       
Goods Producing 1,777,600  1,763,100  1,797,200  14,500  0.8    -19,600  -1.1       
Mining and Logging 218,200  216,300  241,800  1,900  0.9    -23,600  -9.8       
Construction 710,200  704,900  696,500  5,300  0.8    13,700  2.0       
Manufacturing 849,200  841,900  858,900  7,300  0.9    -9,700  -1.1       
Service Providing 10,411,500  10,374,700  10,166,600  36,800  0.4    244,900  2.4       
Trade, Transportation, and Utilities 2,454,800  2,446,700  2,409,600  8,100  0.3    45,200  1.9       
Information 198,000  201,300  201,900  -3,300  -1.6    -3,900  -1.9       
Financial Activities 744,900  739,100  726,800  5,800  0.8    18,100  2.5       
Professional and Business Services 1,661,200  1,647,200  1,615,700  14,000  0.8    45,500  2.8       
Education and Health Services 1,657,700  1,658,600  1,610,600  -900  -0.1    47,100  2.9       
Leisure and Hospitality 1,319,600  1,312,600  1,275,300  7,000  0.5    44,300  3.5       
Other Services 429,500  428,800  423,100  700  0.2    6,400  1.5       
Government 1,945,800  1,940,400  1,903,600  5,400  0.3    42,200  2.2       

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The Texas Workforce Commission is a state agency dedicated to helping Texas employers, workers and communities prosper economically. For details on TWC and the services it offers in coordination with its network of local workforce development boards, call 512-463-8942 or visit www.texasworkforce.org. To receive notifications about TWC programs and services subscribe to our email updates.

 

AUSTIN ⎯ BASF Corporation has partnered with Brazosport College to provide job training using a $328,340 Skills Development Fund grant from the Texas Workforce Commission (TWC). The grant will benefit workers in the Workforce Solutions Gulf Coast area.

“This partnership with BASF and Brazosport College will focus technical training to support an overall efficient operation,” said TWC Commissioner Representing Employers Ruth R. Hughs. “We are pleased to present this grant which will create new employment opportunities for the Lake Jackson area.”

State unemployment rate remains at 4.6 percent in December

AUSTIN ⎯ Texas has added an estimated 210,200 seasonally adjusted jobs since December 2015 with the addition of 800 nonfarm jobs this December. The state has added jobs in 20 of the past 21 months. Texas’ seasonally adjusted unemployment rate maintained a 4.6 percent rate in December.

“Texas employers continue to boost the diverse Texas economy by adding jobs, including 210,200 over the year,” said TWC Chairman Andres Alcantar. “Thanks to the innovation and efforts of employers in a range of industries, Texas workers continue to have more opportunities to demonstrate their world-class work ethic and skills.”

The Education and Health Services industry recorded the largest private-industry employment gain over the
month with 7,300 jobs added. Leisure and Hospitality employment grew by 3,900 jobs in December, and
Manufacturing employment expanded by 1,400 jobs.

“Private-sector employment has been strong over the year with overall job growth of 172,600 jobs added,” said TWC Commissioner Representing Employers Ruth R. Hughs. “These numbers are a testament to the
perseverance and resilience of our Texas employers and the diversity of our Texas economy.”

The Amarillo, Austin-Round Rock and Lubbock Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSA) recorded the month’s
lowest unemployment rate among Texas MSAs with a non-seasonally adjusted rate of 3.2 percent, followed by the College Station-Bryan MSA with a rate of 3.4 for December.

“The Texas labor force has continued to provide employers with the skills and expertise needed to keep the
Texas economy growing,” said TWC Commissioner Representing Labor Julian Alvarez. “TWC and the 28 local
workforce boards are committed to connecting Texas workers with available jobs.”

An audio download with comments from Chairman Alcantar on the latest labor market data is available on the TWC website press release page. Employment estimates released by TWC are produced in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics. All estimates are subject to revision. To access this and more employment data, visit tracer2.com.

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AUSTIN – Lockheed Martin was named Large Employer of the Year at the Texas Workforce Commission’s (TWC) 20th Annual Texas Workforce Conference held Dec. 7-9 in Houston. Lockheed Martin was nominated by Workforce Solutions for Tarrant County (Tarrant) and chosen as the Large Employer of the Year from among three exemplary finalists, out of 26 private-sector employers nominated. All nominees have 500 or more employees and were recognized for contributions to their community’s workforce through innovation and collaboration with their local Texas Workforce Solutions network partner. Lockheed Martin was also recognized with the Local Employer Award of Excellence for the Tarrant County area.

Lockheed Martin is one of the largest aerospace and global security companies in the Dallas/Fort Worth region (DFW) and is engaged in the research, design, development, manufacturing, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems and products. Lockheed Martin employs more than 15,000 workers in the DFW area, contributes $1.6 billion to the local economy and contributes more than $739 million to Texas suppliers and vendors within Tarrant County. The company also leads the DFW Aerospace Consortium and partners with consortium members, TWC, Tarrant County, and local educational institutions to grow the local aerospace industry and create training and job opportunities.
“Through its innovative partnership with Workforce Solutions, educational institutions and local aerospace industry representatives, Lockheed Martin is growing industry in its community and creating a demand for highly skilled jobs for the region,” said TWC Chairman Andres Alcantar. “I commend Lockheed Martin for its contributions to the local workforce and economy, and extend my sincere congratulations.”
In response to workforce demands spurred by industry expansion, Lockheed Martin has made tremendous contributions to workforce development through training and job opportunities. The company is expected to add 2,000 manufacturing jobs over the next three years in support of its F-35 project and was recently awarded a $1.5-million TWC Skills Development Fund grant to develop a cutting-edge aerospace industry training curriculum.
Lockheed Martin has placed 405 unemployed or underemployed engineers in competitive jobs locally, while training 222 new engineers and offers aerospace and aviation training in partnership with Tarrant County Community College and Tarrant County Community Learning Center.
“Congratulations to Lockheed Martin for its tremendous contribution to the local workforce, and for its efforts to shape the next generation of highly skilled workers in its community,” said TWC Commissioner Representing Employers Ruth R. Hughs. “Lockheed Martin’s collaboration with local partners exemplifies the positive and lasting impact employers can make in their communities.”
Lockheed Martin has also shown a strong commitment to growing the local aerospace worker pipeline by supporting career and technology programs that include science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) educational programs for middle and high school students. The company is an avid supporter of the STEM program Project Lead the Way, investing $1 million in the Fort Worth Independent School District for implementation of these programs.
“I congratulate Lockheed Martin and recognize its commitment to helping new and incumbent members of the workforce gain the training and skills needed to succeed and its ongoing creation of quality local jobs,” said TWC Commissioner Representing Labor Julian Alvarez.
Lockheed Martin and its DFW Aerospace Consortium partners also launched the “Gotta Jet?” aerospace career awareness campaign to promote engineering and other high-demand aerospace industry careers to students. The company offers internship opportunities and employees volunteer their time at local schools in support of National Engineering Week.
“Working closely with our community education institutions, the DFW Aerospace Consortium and Workforce Solutions for Tarrant County, we continue to encourage interest in engineering, aerospace and aviation careers,” said Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Human Relations Vice President Jean Wallace. “We are honored to receive the Large Employer of the Year award from the Texas Workforce Commission.”
Additionally, the other two exemplary employer finalists for Texas Workforce Solutions Large Employer of the Year included:
•       Emerson Process Management (Emerson) was nominated by Workforce Solutions Texoma (Texoma). Emerson collaborates directly with Texoma for recruitment, job postings, pre-employment assessments and participation on the Workforce Development Board. Emerson is not only a premiere employer in Sherman, it is also a driving force in developing the next generation of industry workers. It leads local efforts to educate students, parents and teachers about career pathways, participates in career fairs for students, and has agreed to provide funds to students at two local high schools participating in a Level I Manufacturing Certificate training program.
•       James Avery Craftsman, Inc. (James Avery) was nominated by Workforce Solutions Alamo (Alamo). James Avery collaborates directly with Alamo for recruitment, job postings and seasonal hiring fairs. In addition to hiring more than 2,000 seasonal employees annually in addition to its non-seasonal workers, James Avery contributes to the community by providing products for fundraising events and donating funds to community arts, educational, environmental, faith-based and health care organizations.
Each of the 28 local workforce development boards also recognized a Local Employer of Excellence at the conference. The award honors a private sector employer that is actively involved with Texas Workforce Solutions and has made a positive impact on employers, workers and the community.
Awards also were granted to local workforce development boards that provided outstanding services to Texas employers, workers, job-seekers and local communities. Additionally, monetary awards were given to the boards that were recognized for outstanding performance. Monetary awards will be used to enhance board service programs during the next year.
The primary goal of TWC and the workforce boards is to respond to the needs of Texas employers through locally-designed, market-driven workforce development initiatives and services. All employers, workers and job seekers are eligible to take advantage of these services.

Governor Greg Abbott
Governor Greg Abbott

AUSTIN ⎯ Leaders of the Texas Education Agency (TEA), Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) and Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) are hosting the inaugural Texas Education & Workforce Summit this week in Austin. The summit is taking place at the AT&T Executive Education and Conference Center on the University of Texas at Austin campus.

Set for Sept. 19 and 20, the one-and-a-half-day summit – which is part of Gov. Greg Abbott’s Tri-Agency Workforce Initiative – marks the culmination of a series of workforce forums across the state assessing regional needs and ensuring Texas is poised to compete in an ever-changing 21st century economy.

The summit features numerous speakers and panels from business and industry, public education, higher education, philanthropy and government who are sharing best practices on collaborative efforts taking place statewide to strengthen the education-to-workforce pipeline. Gov. Greg Abbott gave the Summit’s keynote address on Monday.

“I established the Tri-Agency Workforce Initiative earlier this year to seek out innovative approaches to meeting the state’s workforce goals,” said Gov. Abbott. “After several months of gathering information and meeting with stakeholders across Texas, I look forward to hearing their recommendations on how to help students build marketable skills and prepare them to successfully compete in a 21st century economy, while making higher education more accessible to all Texans.”

Gov. Abbott established the Tri-Agency Workforce Initiative to assess local economic activity, examine workforce challenges and opportunities and consider innovative approaches to meeting the state’s education and workforce goals.

As part of that initiative, Commissioner of Higher Education Raymund Paredes, Texas Commissioner of Education Mike Morath and Texas Workforce Commission Chairman Andres Alcantar, along with TWC Commissioners Ruth Hughs and Julian Alvarez, launched a series of regional forums beginning in March to help establish a framework for closer collaboration between public education, higher education and workforce development. Forums were held in Midland, San Antonio, Houston, Dallas, El Paso, McAllen, Tyler/Longview and Austin.

During the Texas Education & Workforce Summit, agency leaders are presenting their draft recommendations related to the Governor’s charge for the Tri-Agency Initiative. Summit participants are encouraged to provide feedback during the event before the final recommendations are presented to Gov. Abbott later this fall.
For information regarding the Texas Education & Workforce Summit, visit the THECB website at http://www.thecb.state.tx.us/index.cfm?objectid=57FE5133-FBAD-7409-0EC28AC7C0FA1210&flushcache=1&showdraft=1.

 For additional information, contact:

  • Lisa Givens – Texas Workforce Commission
    (512) 463-8556

Lisa.Givens@twc.state.tx.us

  • Lauren Callahan – Texas Education Agency

(512) 463-9000
Lauren.Callahan@tea.texas.gov

  • Kelly Carper Polden – Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board

(512) 427-6119

Kelly.Polden@thecb.state.tx.us