Tags Posts tagged with "Katy Prairie Conservancy"

Katy Prairie Conservancy

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HOUSTON (February 4, 2016) –The Katy Prairie Conservancy (KPC) presents three birding events in February, including Coming Home to Roost on February 17 and February 24 and Wild West Tour: Photographing Waterfowl of the Prairie, led by Master Naturalist Glenn Olsen, on February 27. Both are for adult learners.

Guests at Coming Home to Roost should see these sandhill cranes come to roost during the evening on the Katy Prairie. Photo by Mac Womack.
Guests at Coming Home to Roost should see these sandhill cranes come to roost during the evening on the Katy Prairie. Photo by Mac Womack.

Coming Home to Roost: Wednesday, February 17 and Wednesday, February 24, 5:30 p.m. – 6:45 p.m. at Mary Manor Preserve. Each winter the Katy Prairie becomes home to flocks of birds fleeing cooler climates for the season. Join KPC board of directors’ member Steve Gast to see one of the most charismatic of these species, the sandhill crane, as it comes in to roost on the prairie for the evening. The cost is $5 per person, and spaces are limited. You must register for each class separately.

Northern shovelers, a type of duck, might be seen on the Katy Prairie during the Wild West Tour: Photographing Waterfowl of the Prairie. Photo by Mac Womack.
Northern shovelers, a type of duck, might be seen on the Katy Prairie during the Wild West Tour: Photographing Waterfowl of the Prairie. Photo by Mac Womack.

Wild West Tour: Photographing Waterfowl of the Prairie:  Saturday, February 27, 1 pm. – 5 p.m. beginning at Indiangrass Preserve. The Katy Prairie is one of the best places to photograph birds, especially waterfowl in the wintertime. Join bird expert and photographer Glenn Olsen as he visits some of KPC’s preserves to take photos of the prairie’s winter residents. Guests will bring their own cameras to this freehand photography class in which no blinds are used. The cost is $50 per person, and part of this fee goes toward supporting KPC’s educational programming.

“Birders of all levels and interests are invited to come out to the Katy Prairie for one of our bird-related events this month,” says Christine Mansfield, KPC’s Community Outreach Manager. “These are perfect for the amateur photographer who has a strong interest in nature photography. The Katy Prairie is home to more than 300 species of birds, and winter is an ideal time to see many of them.”

The events require advance registration on katyprairie.org by clicking the “Visit” tab to find “Events.” Walking shoes, clothing layers, gloves and a hat are recommended, since the prairie tends to be chillier and windier than an urban setting. Participants are also encouraged to bring water, cameras, binoculars, and snacks, if desired. For information go to our website or call 713-523-6135. Directions to Indiangrass Preserve are also available.

The Katy Prairie Conservancy is a nonprofit land trust dedicated to preserving an ecologically vital tallgrass prairie and associated wetlands area on Houston’s far west side for the enjoyment and benefit of all. You can find us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @katyprairie.

KPC Restoration in Progress Sign_Lajla White
The Indiangrass Preserve, under the leadership of the Katy Prairie Conservancy, is undergoing restoration to improve the quality of this important area of the Katy Prairie. Photo by Lajla White.

The Katy Prairie Conservancy (KPC) continues its winter programming, with an eye on spring, as it presents two nature events in February – Ranger Trek: Rebuilding Paradise and Unplugged Adventure: Promise of Spring. The two events will begin at KPC’s Indiangrass Preserve, 31950 Hebert Road in Waller. They include:
Ranger Trek: Rebuilding Paradise: Saturday, February 13, 10 a.m. – 11 a.m. The Indiangrass Preserve restoration is a demonstration of KPC’s commitment to improving the quality of its preserves for wildlife and for humans too. Come out and learn how this ground-breaking work is being done, take a hike on the newly restored Indiangrass Preserve, and help pot up a few new plants for the restoration effort.
Cost: Free. Audience: Adult Learners.

2.These are seedlings from the Native Seed Nursery on Katy Prairie Conservancy’s Indiangrass Preserve.  Photo by Christine Mansfield.
These are seedlings from the Native Seed Nursery on Katy Prairie Conservancy’s Indiangrass Preserve. Photo by Christine Mansfield.

Unplugged Adventure: Promise of Spring: Saturday, February 27, 10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Spring is right around the corner, and now is the perfect time to learn how you can prepare your yard for a productive, green season. Participants will take a fun hike looking for signs of spring, do a take-home activity in our Native Seed Nursery, and talk about how you can prepare your yard for your wild neighbors.
Cost: $5. Audience: All Ages.

“We invite people all over the Houston area to check out the Katy Prairie with one or both of our February activities, where you can see first-hand how the Indiangrass Preserve is being restored and improved,” says Christine Mansfield, KPC’s Community Outreach Manager. “With Ranger Trek, you can do a good deed for nature and for our Unplugged Adventure, guests will learn how their yards can be transformed for wildlife.”

 

The events require advance registration on katyprairie.org by clicking the “Visit” tab to find “Events.” Walking shoes, clothing layers, gloves and a hat are recommended, since the prairie tends to be chillier and windier than an urban setting. Participants are also encouraged to bring water, cameras, binoculars, and snacks, if desired. For information go to our website or call 713-523-6135. Directions to Indiangrass Preserve are also available.

The Katy Prairie Conservancy is a nonprofit land trust dedicated to preserving an ecologically vital tallgrass prairie and associated wetlands area on Houston’s far west side for the enjoyment and benefit of all. You can find us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @katyprairie.

HOUSTON (January 27, 2016) –The Katy Prairie Conservancy (KPC) continues its winter programming, with an eye on spring, as it presents two nature events in February– Ranger Trek: Rebuilding Paradise and Unplugged Adventure: Promise of Spring. The two events will begin at KPC’s Indiangrass Preserve, 31950 Hebert Road in Waller. They include:

Ranger Trek: Rebuilding Paradise: Saturday, February 13, 10 a.m. – 11 a.m. The Indiangrass Preserve restoration is a demonstration of KPC’s commitment to improving the quality of its preserves for wildlife and for humans too. Come out and learn how this ground-breaking work is being done, take a hike on the newly restored Indiangrass Preserve, and help pot up a few new plants for the restoration effort. Cost: Free Audience: Adult Learners.

Unplugged Adventure: Promise of Spring:  Saturday, February 27, 10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Spring is right around the corner, and now is the perfect time to learn how you can prepare your yard for a productive, green season. Participants will take a fun hike looking for signs of spring, do a take-home activity in our Native Seed Nursery, and talk about how you can prepare your yard for your wild neighbors. Cost: $5. Audience: All Ages.

“We invite people all over the Houston area to check out the Katy Prairie with one or both of our February activities, where you can see first-hand how the Indiangrass Preserve is being restored and improved,” says Christine Mansfield, KPC’s Community Outreach Manager. “With Ranger Trek, you can do a good deed for nature and for our Unplugged Adventure, guests will learn how their yards can be transformed for wildlife.”

The events require advance registration on katyprairie.org by clicking the “Visit” tab to find “Events.” Walking shoes, clothing layers, gloves and a hat are recommended, since the prairie tends to be chillier and windier than an urban setting. Participants are also encouraged to bring water, cameras, binoculars, and snacks, if desired. For information go to our website or call 713-523-6135. Directions to Indiangrass Preserve are also available.

The Katy Prairie Conservancy is a nonprofit land trust dedicated to preserving an ecologically vital tallgrass prairie and associated wetlands area on Houston’s far west side for the enjoyment and benefit of all. You can find us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @katyprairie.

KPC Seedlings in Nursery_Christine Mansfield Photo
These are seedlings from the Native Seed Nursery on Katy Prairie Conservancy’s Indiangrass Preserve. Photo by Christine Mansfield.
KPC Restoration in Progress Sign_Lajla White
The Indiangrass Preserve, under the leadership of the Katy Prairie Conservancy, is undergoing restoration to improve the quality of this important area of the Katy Prairie. Photo by Lajla White.

 

 

 

katyprairiecons2Adults and Children Alike Will Find Entertaining Nature Activities

HOUSTON (January 6, 2016) – This month the Katy Prairie Conservancy (KPC) presents Unplugged Adventure: Realm of the Eagle and Wild West Tour: Photographing Sparrows on the Prairie. Adults and children alike are invited to attend the Unplugged Adventure on Jan. 16, while the Wild West Tour photography event on Jan. 31 is for adult learners only. Details include:

Unplugged Adventure: Realm of the Eagle: Jan. 16 from 10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Each winter, mighty hunters with razor-sharp bills, keen vision, and a six-foot wingspan soar high above the Katy Prairie. Their chalky-white heads reveal their identity – Bald Eagles. The Katy Prairie’s wetlands, prairies, and creeks make it one of the premier bird watching spots in the United States. Join us for a Texas-sized adventure on the Indiangrass Preserve (31950 Hebert Road, Waller) as we go in search of rare, beautiful, and charismatic birds of the Katy Prairie and try to see the prairie through the eyes of an eagle. Cost: $5 per person. Audience: Adults and children.

GlennOlsen on Katy Prairie_Christine Mansfield Photo
Master Naturalist and photographer Glenn Olsen trains his camera on the Katy Prairie. Photo by Christine Mansfield.

Wild West Tour: Photographing Sparrows of the Prairie: Jan. 31, 7:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.  The Katy Prairie is one of the best places to photograph birds, especially in the wintertime. Join bird expert and photographer Glenn Olsen as he leads the group on some of KPC’s preserves to take photos of the prairie’s winter residents. The class will start from the Indiangrass Preserve also. Note: This is a freehand photography class, and no blinds will be used. Please bring your own camera. Cost: $50. Audience: Adult Learners.

ChippingSparrow_GregLavaty
The Chipping Sparrow could possibly by seen during the Wild West Tour: Photographing Sparrows on the Prairie. Photo by Greg Lavaty.

The events require advance registration on katyprairie.org. Click the “Visit” tab to find “Events.” Walking shoes, clothing layers, gloves and a hat are recommended, since the prairie tends to be chillier and windier than an urban setting. Participants are also encouraged to bring water, cameras, binoculars and snacks, if desired. For information go to our website or call 713-523-6135. Directions to Indiangrass Preserve are also available.

The Katy Prairie Conservancy is a nonprofit land trust dedicated to preserving an ecologically vital tallgrass prairie and associated wetlands area on Houston’s far west side for the enjoyment and benefit of all. You can find us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @katyprairie.

Sandhill Cranes_Mac Womack
These Sandhill Cranes can be found on Katy Prairie Conservancy’s preserves. Photo by Mac Womack.

Check out three different entertaining nature activities on the Katy Prairie Jan. 9 for adult learners only, as the Katy Prairie Conservancy (KPC) presents Ranger Trek and two Wild West Tours. Birders may find it difficult to choose just one event, since all relate to our fine-feathered friends.
“Winter is a wonderful time to explore the Katy Prairie,” says Christine Mansfield, KPC’s Community Outreach Manager. “We encourage folks to start off the New Year by appreciating what nature has to offer with one or more of our exciting events.”
The events require advance registration on katyprairie.org by clicking the “Visit” tab to find “Events.” Walking shoes, clothing layers, gloves and a hat are recommended, since the prairie tends to be chillier and windier than an urban setting. Participants are also encouraged to bring water, cameras, binoculars, and snacks, if desired. For information go to our website or call 713-523-6135. Directions to Indiangrass Preserve are also available.
The Katy Prairie Conservancy is a nonprofit land trust dedicated to preserving an ecologically vital tallgrass prairie and associated wetlands area on Houston’s far west side for the enjoyment and benefit of all. You can find us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @katyprairie.

The three events will begin at KPC’s Indiangrass Preserve, 31950 Hebert Road in Waller. They include:

Ranger Trek: For the Birds from 10 a.m. – 11 a.m. In 2013 the Katy Prairie was designated a Global Important Bird Area in recognition of the prairie’s bird diversity and the critical role that the prairie plays in bird migration. Learn how KPC is saving and improving bird habitat and take a hike in a newly restored prairie-wetland habitat searching for waterfowl and predatory birds. Cost: Free.

Wild West Tour: “Winter Birds” – 1 p.m. – 4 p.m. Sparrows, hawks, harriers, ducks, geese, and even Bald Eagles flock to the Katy Prairie during the winter months. For this exclusive tour, you’ll start at the Indiangrass Preserve and then join bird expert Glenn Olsen as he leads the group to several preserves usually closed to the general public. Space is limited, so reserve your spot today. Cost: $50.

Wild West Tour: Owl Prowl and Coyote Howl – 5 p.m. – 8 p.m. Join Master Naturalist Glenn Olsen, for a brisk winter evening on the Katy Prairie. After a light dinner, you’ll be able to look and listen for elusive owls as they hunt on silent wings for their own dinner on some of KPC’s private preserves. You might also hear coyotes howling. Cost: $50.

Events require advance registration on katyprairie.org by clicking the “Visit” tab to find “Events.”

KPC_BaldEagle1_greglavaty
Bald Eagle. Photo by Greg Lavaty

HOUSTON, December 18, 2015 – If you’re looking for something new and different to kick off the New Year, consider volunteering with the Katy Prairie Conservancy (KPC) and other groups for the 40th annual Cypress Creek Christmas Bird Count (CBC) on the Katy Prairie on Jan. 1. Located in the Cypress Creek watershed, the Katy Prairie is one of several CBC locations in the Upper Gulf Coast region.

Volunteers will meet at Paul Rushing Park starting at 6 a.m., located at 9114 Katy-Hockley Rd. in Katy. Everyone who chooses to count on KPC property must sign a release form before participating in the Christmas Bird Count. The bird count lasts all day; however, participants can arrange to take part for only a portion of the day.

Nationally, it’s the 116th annual Christmas Bird Count sponsored by the National Audubon Society, occurring December 14 through January 5. The all-volunteer effort aims to take a snapshot of bird populations to monitor their status and distribution across the Western Hemisphere and thus gain important information, such as how birds are affected by climate change.

“Counts are open to birders of all skill levels,” says Jaime González, Conservation Education Director for the Katy Prairie Conservancy. “Novices are placed in groups with more experienced birders, allowing them to learn how to identify and count bird species. It’s a fun tradition for many folks. You’re contributing to providing important scientific data about birds that is shared with federal, state and private authorities.”

González noted it’s that possible participants will see bald eagles during the count, as a few have recently been sighted on KPC’s Indiangrass Preserve and Warren Lake on several occasions. “We have had huge interest in the eagles,” says González. “It’s always exciting to see these beautiful birds of prey on the prairie.”
There is no cost to participate in the Christmas Bird Count. Learn more about CBCs online by visiting the Houston Audubon and National Audubon websites. Contact compilers Fred Collins and Kendra Kocab at KlebWoods@Pct3.com for more information on the Cypress Creek CBC. Dress warmly, and wear good walking shoes that can handle wet conditions. Consider bringing water, snacks and/or lunch.

The Katy Prairie Conservancy is a nonprofit land trust dedicated to preserving an ecologically vital tallgrass prairie and associated wetlands area on Houston’s far west side for the enjoyment and benefit of all. For more information about KPC, log onto katyprairie.org or contact 713-523-6135. You can also find us on Facebook and Twitter @katyprairie and on Instagram @savekatyprairie.

Photo Caption:
The bald eagle is just one of the birds that could be spotted during the Christmas Bird Count on the Katy Prairie Jan. 1. Photo by Greg Lavaty.


KPCGivingTuesday3-WesleyNewman,KPCConservationStewardshipDirector (1)HOUSTON, November 20, 2015
– The Katy Prairie Conservancy (KPC) invites you to “saddle up and help the Katy Prairie by preserving its rich history, protecting sensitive wetlands and streams and conserving more land for people and wildlife,” as part of #GivingTuesday on Dec. 1. Participation in this fundraiser will help the land trust provide access for Texans of all ages to this ecological wonder for years to come.

Now in its fourth year, #GivingTuesday is a global day of giving fueled by the power of social media and collaboration. Observed in the United States on the Tuesday following Thanksgiving and the highly touted shopping events, Black Friday and Cyber Monday, #GivingTuesday kicks off the charitable season, when many focus on their holiday and end-of-year giving. #GivingTuesday has become a movement that celebrates and supports giving and philanthropy with events throughout the year and a growing catalog of resources.

“Our #GivingTuseday campaign ties in with our year-end initiative called ‘Westward Ho!,’” says KPC Community Outreach Manager Christine Mansfield. “The wide open spaces of the Katy Prairie are just 30 miles west-northwest of downtown, though they seem a world apart. The prairie boasts the region’s largest working cattle ranch plus some of its finest wildlife habitat and farmland. In fact, KPC was named a Global Important Bird Area in 2013. We encourage people to make an investment in their environmental future by donating what they can on Dec. 1.”

The Katy Prairie Conservancy believes that all great cities need nature close at hand. The tallgrass prairie, with its intermittent wetlands and belts of trees along creeks and bayous, is one of our original landscapes and remains an essential ingredient of our region’s quality of life. KPC has permanently protected over 20,000 acres of the prairie so far – a beginning it hopes to double in the near future.

Donations from #GivingTuesday can go a long way in preserving this natural resource for generations to come. Funds will help the Katy Prairie Conservancy:

  • Conserve additional land on the Katy Prairie for both people and wildlife
  • Restore streams, wetlands and grasslands on KPC’s preserves
  • Implement sustainable hunting, farming, and grazing practices
  • Develop trails to improve recreational access.

To learn more about KPC’s #GivingTuesday campaign, please visit donatenow.networkforgood.org/westwardho or go on to the Conservancy’s website at katyprairie.org. Additionally, KPC presents several events on the prairie in December for all ages, which will educate and entertain.

The Katy Prairie Conservancy is a nonprofit land trust dedicated to preserving an ecologically vital tallgrass prairie and associated wetlands area on Houston’s far west side for the enjoyment and benefit of all.

 

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KPCWestsideHSWarrenRanch1
Westside High School students learn roping skills from cowboy Stephen McDonald on an educational field trip to the Warren Ranch, led by the Katy Prairie Conservancy.

 The Warren Ranch on the Katy Prairie became a living classroom for environmental science and biology students from Houston ISD’s Westside High School Nov. 4 and Nov. 5, thanks to the Katy Prairie Conservancy’s (KPC) education initiatives. KPC Conservation Education Director Jaime González led the charge for the two-day outdoor programs, with assistance from Community Outreach Manager Christine Mansfield and Ranch Manager Sam Reese.

The students rode in buses out to the Warren Ranch, near Hockley on the far west side of Houston, beginning each day at 9 a.m. and ending at 2 p.m. while packing in lots of activities. On Wednesday, there were 36 students, while 45 attended on Thursday.

Each morning, students rotated among three educational stations, where students became familiar with the flora and fauna of the Katy Prairie, including coachwhip snakes, bald eagles, Yellow Indiangrass and Little Bluestem grass, made seed balls and learned to use the iNaturalist social media app to catalogue biodiversity.

Additional activities included:

  • Ranching – Discussion of ranching heritage, along with roping and branding demos by working cowboys from the Warren Ranch. The students then practiced roping on “wooden cows.”
  • Restoration – Students helped to restore prairie near the Wildlife Viewing Platform on Warren Lake.
  • Birding – Students looked for migrating birds and tested their skills at bird identification, even spotting two bald eagles hunting for fish on Warren Lake.
  • After a barbecue lunch, the students took a short hike to learn about biodiversity and KPC’s stream restoration project.
  • “Play time” allowed them to throw Frisbees® or engage in other sorts of outdoor recreation.
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Westside High School students learn about biodiversity at Warren Lake on the Katy Prairie, during an educational field trip sponsored by the Katy Prairie Conservancy.

“The feedback from the Westside High School students and science teachers about this outdoor field trip was wonderful,” says González. “It adds an important dimension to classroom work when students can be a part of the ecosystem that is the defining characteristic of the Houston area – the coastal prairie. To see these teens so engaged with nature and then enjoying the cowboy heritage activities validated my passion for hands-on education. It works!”

Part of González’s job involves expanding collaborative efforts with other organizations and agencies around the issues of conservation and education. He also assists with grassland restoration efforts on several Katy Prairie preserves and at more than 20 Prairie Builder Schools (including Westside High School) and Parks throughout the Greater Houston area.

The Katy Prairie Conservancy is a nonprofit land trust dedicated to preserving an ecologically vital tallgrass prairie and associated wetlands area on Houston’s far west side for the enjoyment and benefit of all. You can find us on Facebook and Twitter @katyprairie and on Instagram @savekatyprairie.

Photos courtesy of the Katy Prairie Conservancy.

 

 

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katyprairiecons2November ushers in not one, but three nature activities on the Katy Prairie, with a community service prairie restoration project and the Wild West Tours “Owl Prowl and Coyote Howl” and “Sparrows on the Prairie,” both led by Master Naturalist Glenn Olsen, and sponsored by the Katy Prairie Conservancy (KPC).

On Nov. 14, the public is invited to help KPC in “Putting Down Roots” for one of the largest restoration efforts yet on the Katy Prairie. Volunteers will work together to transplant native prairie plants in order to restore 55 acres of newly reconstructed prairie habitat at Indiangrass Preserve. The planting will help feed monarch butterflies and native birds for years to come.

“Putting Down Roots,” is free to the public, although registration is required, and carpooling is encouraged since parking is limited. The project runs from 9 a.m. – noon and is open to all ages. Participants should dress for the prairie – wear pants, close-toed shoes, and clothing that can get muddy. It can be chilly and windy on the prairie; therefore a hat and layers are also recommended. Lunch, snacks, and door prizes will be provided.

Then join birding expert Olsen for one or both Wild West Tours. On Nov. 21, from 5:30 – 8:30 p.m., he leads “Owl Prowl and Coyote Howl” – an evening jaunt to find elusive owls as they hunt and to detect the howls of a pack of coyotes on the prairie. The next day, Nov. 22, join Olsen in the morning hours between 7:30 a.m. and noon for “Sparrows on the Prairie” as the group tries to spot the secretive birds that blend into the late fall landscape on fields and fence rows. Both events will start at KPC’s Indiangrass Preserve, 31950 Hebert Road, (in Waller) before folks set off to explore prairie preserves which are usually closed to the general public.

The Wild West Tours require advance registration online and are geared toward adult learners. The cost is $50 per person, and a portion of that fee goes toward funding KPC educational programs. A light dinner is served for “Owl Prowl and Coyote Howl.”

“Our November events offer a fun, hands-on project and two opportunities for folks to experience wildlife on the prairie,” says Christine Mansfield, Community Outreach Manager of the Katy Prairie Conservancy. “’Putting Down Roots’ is tied to Prairie Month, with events and activities related to prairie conservation all over the Houston area, while the Wild West Tours feature Glenn Olsen, a renowned nature expert and one of our most popular tour guides.”

You can also register for the KPC activities by going to katyprairie.org and clicking on the “Visit” tab to find “Events.”  If you are interested in learning more about “Putting Down Roots,” contact Christine Mansfield at 713-523-6135.

The Katy Prairie Conservancy is a nonprofit land trust dedicated to preserving an ecologically vital tallgrass prairie and associated wetlands area on Houston’s far west side for the enjoyment and benefit of all.

Wild West Tour: Beginning Birding on the Katy Prairie and Unplugged Adventure: Not So Scary Prairie

HOUSTON, October 6, 2015 – The Katy Prairie Conservancy (KPC) program offerings for October include the Wild West Tour: Beginning Birding on the Katy Prairie on Saturday, Oct. 17 from 7:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. and the Unplugged Adventure: Not So Scary Prairie on Saturday, Oct. 31 from 5 p.m. – 8 p.m., both at the Indiangrass Preserve on the Katy Prairie. Advance registration is required for these events.

The Katy Prairie is home to more than 300 species of resident and migratory birds, making it an ideal place to learn the ins and outs of birding. In Beginning Birding on the Katy Prairie, join bird expert and master naturalist Glenn Olsen for a fall tour of some of KPC’s best preserves. The class is appropriate for both beginning birders and seasoned veterans alike, and the cost is $50. Part of this fee goes toward educational programs for the Katy Prairie Conservancy.

For those seeking a “wild” trick-or-treating opportunity for the family this Halloween, look no further than the Katy Prairie. Join us for an evening of adventure on Halloween as guests collect treats and learn about spooky nighttime animals that inhabit our prairie. The sights and sounds of the prairie after dark with Not So Scary Prairie will provide entertainment for all ages. Cost is $5 per person.

“KPC’s October events illustrate our diverse programming on the Katy Prairie,” says Christine Mansfield, Community Outreach Manager. “Birding is one of the most popular pastimes in America right now, and our preserve system provides some of the best birdwatching sites in the entire state. For those who prefer nocturnal animals, our Halloween Unplugged Adventure will combine fun and learning with KPC staff and volunteers.”

Suggested items to bring/wear for the October events include water, long pants and shirt, close-toed shoes, bug repellant and a hat. Binoculars and a camera can also make the classes more engaging. Indiangrass Preserve is located at 31950 Hebert Road in Waller, and directions are on the KPC website.

Also this fall, you can volunteer for KPC’s Prairie Work Days to help maintain our Coastal Prairie Native Seed Nursery, combat invasive species, mulch trails, clear fences of vegetation and restore prairie habitats. These are every Tuesday from 9 a.m. – 3 p.m., and every Friday and Saturday from 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. at Indiangrass Preserve.

Indiangrass Preserve will also be open during those times for visitors to walk the trails and check out the nursery. Additionally, the Matt Cook Wildlife Viewing Platform at Warren Lake is open daily from 7 a.m. through dusk.

Be sure and call, email or check Facebook or Twitter before coming out for a volunteer day or to access the trails. Sometimes we host our volunteer days at other preserves. Contact information is 713-523-6135 and lhodges@katyprairie.org.

The Katy Prairie Conservancy is a nonprofit land trust dedicated to preserving an ecologically vital tallgrass prairie and associated wetlands area on Houston’s far west side for the enjoyment and benefit of all. You can find us on Facebook and Twitter @katyprairie and on Instagram @savekatyprairie.