Tags Posts tagged with "Katy Prairie Conservancy"

Katy Prairie Conservancy

Accreditation Promotes Public Trust, Ensures Permanence

kpcbioblitzsthsstudentsThe Katy Prairie Conservancy (KPC), a nonprofit land trust dedicated to preserving an ecologically vital tallgrass prairie and associated wetlands on Houston’s far west side, today announced it has been accredited by the Land Trust Accreditation Commission. This is a mark of distinction in land conservation and signifies the Commission’s confidence that KPC is managed in an effective and efficient manner and that its lands will be protected forever.

“Accreditation demonstrates KPC’s commitment to permanent land conservation and lets its constituents, funders, cooperating agencies, landowners, and supporters know that we practice in an ethical manner and that they can trust us to do the right thing,” says Foster Carter, President of the board of directors of the Katy Prairie Conservancy.

The Katy Prairie Conservancy was among 38 land trusts across the United States to achieve accreditation or to have accreditation renewed this summer. KPC joins the more than 350 accredited land trusts that demonstrate their commitment to professional excellence through accreditation, helping to maintain the public’s trust in their work.

“It is exciting to recognize Katy Prairie Conservancy with this distinction,” said Tammara Van Ryn, executive director of the Commission. “Accredited land trusts stand together, united behind strong ethical standards ensuring the places people love will be conserved forever. This network of land trusts has demonstrated fiscal accountability, strong organizational leadership and lasting stewardship of conservation land.”

KPC has already conserved more than 20,000 acres of the Katy Prairie. “We are honored to be recognized for our preservation and conservation efforts on the Katy Prairie,” says Mary Anne Piacentini KPC’s executive director. “The prairie is enormously productive, offering valuable services to the region, including reducing downstream flooding, removing sediment and pollutants from nearby wetlands and water bodies, providing recreational opportunities and sequestering carbon,” Piacentini notes.

Long-term goals for the Katy Prairie Conservancy are to protect between 30,000 – 50,000 acres of the Katy Prairie; provide access and programming to allow the public to enjoy the Katy Prairie; manage protected land to preserve and enhance its natural resources; restore and improve habitat for upland- and wetland-related species and offer programs that educate participants on the importance of conserving the prairie for the benefit of Texans for years to come.

About the Katy Prairie Conservancy

The Katy Prairie Conservancy is a nonprofit land trust dedicated to preserving an ecologically vital tallgrass prairie and associated wetlands on Houston’s far west side for the enjoyment and benefit of all. You can find us at www.katyprairie.org and on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @katyprairie.

About the Land Trust Accreditation Commission

The Land Trust Accreditation Commission inspires excellence, promotes public trust, and ensures permanence in the conservation of open lands by recognizing organizations that meet rigorous quality standards and strive for continuous improvement. The Commission, established in 2006 as an independent program of the Land Trust Alliance, is governed by a volunteer board of diverse land conservation and nonprofit management experts. For more, visit www.landtrustaccreditation.org.

About the Land Trust Alliance

Founded in 1982, the Land Trust Alliance is a national land conservation organization that works to save the places people love by strengthening land conservation across America. The Alliance represents more than 1,100 member land trusts supported by more than 100,000 volunteers and 5 million members nationwide. The Alliance is based in Washington, D.C. and operates several regional offices. More information about the Alliance is available at www.landtrustalliance.org

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American Avocets are one of the many types of shorebirds that could be seen on the Katy Prairie on Sept 6.  Photo by Bob Honig.
American Avocets are one of the many types of shorebirds that could be seen on the Katy Prairie on Sept 6. Photo by Bob Honig.

The Katy Prairie Conservancy (KPC) invites community members from the greater Houston area to come out to the Katy Prairie on Sept. 6 to participate in World Shorebirds Day, an international count day for sandpipers and their relatives.

Katy Prairie Conservancy officials and volunteers will conduct counts of wetlands on the Indiangrass Preserve starting at KPC’s Field Office at approximately 4 p.m. and then proceed to another property to see shorebirds and remain there until dusk (approximately 7:45 p.m.). Anyone who wishes to participate in the count and learn about fall shorebirds on the Katy Prairie is welcome. Additionally, there will be other birds to be observed and included in the overall count, along with other animals.

The Global Shorebird Counting Program is one of the key events of the World Shorebirds Day on Sept. 6, an effort to raise awareness about the importance of regular bird monitoring/counting as the core element of protection of bird populations and habitat conservation.

According to the World Shorebirds website, saving birds is impossible without knowing the actual number of individuals of a bird species living in the world. Population figures should not be guesses but based on countings carried out by thousands of volunteers and professionals worldwide. The result is an accurate population figure and trend, which is one of the fundamental elements to assess the legal protection status of any species.

Participants are required to sign a release when they arrive (or print and sign it in advance). You can find an Adults Only release and Adults + Children release on the KPC website.  Directions to the Katy Prairie Conservancy Field Office can be found on our directions page. Leaders for this event are Bob Honig and Steve Gast, members of KPC’s Stewardship Committee.

Please arrive at the Field Office between 3:30 and 4 p.m. in order to sign in before we begin counting.  Come prepared to stand or walk for two to three hours under the weather conditions on that day (you can bring a folding chair if you like). Bring water, and wear appropriate footwear and comfortable clothing for strong sun and possibly mosquitos. Participants may be walking up to one mile (but no farther) at the most distant location during the bird census.

The Katy Prairie Conservancy is a nonprofit land trust dedicated to preserving an ecologically vital tallgrass prairie and associated wetlands area on Houston’s far west side for the enjoyment and benefit of all. You can find us on the web at katyprairie.org and on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @katyprairie.

Adults and Children Alike Will Find Entertaining Activities, Including a Bike Ride

In July, the Katy Prairie Conservancy (KPC) presents two fun events for various age groups, including Unplugged Adventure: Sunset Bike Ride and Ranger Trek: Summer Soundtrack. The Sunset Bike Ride will interest cyclists, while Ranger Trek: Summer Soundtrack focuses on wildlife.

Join the Katy Prairie Conservancy for our Unplugged Adventure: Sunset Bike Ride on July 9. Photo courtesy of Katy Prairie Conservancy.
Join the Katy Prairie Conservancy for our Unplugged Adventure: Sunset Bike Ride on July 9. Photo courtesy of Katy Prairie Conservancy.

Unplugged Adventure:

Sunset Bike Ride: July 9 from 6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. Bring your bike out for an evening range ride on the historic Warren Ranch. This leisurely ride along ranch roads will be fun for all ages. As the sun goes down, watch the prairie come alive – you might even hear an owl or two. Audience: All Ages. Cost: $5 per person.

Ranger Treks:

2.During Katy Prairie Conservancy’s Ranger Trek, participants might even see some bees, which are crucial to our eco-system. Photo by Jaime Gonzalez.
During Katy Prairie Conservancy’s Ranger Trek, participants might even see some bees, which are crucial to our eco-system. Photo by Jaime Gonzalez.

Summer Soundtrack: July 23 from 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. at Indiangrass Preserve. Join KPC Rangers on a hike of discovery as we explore the sounds and sights of the summer prairie. We’ll be listening for colorful migratory birds, breeding frogs, and melodic katydids. Audience: All ages. Cost: Free.
“We know it’s very hot in July, but that’s no reason not to enjoy our events on the Katy Prairie,” says Mary Anne Piacentini, KPC’s Executive Director. “The activities are for all ages and held in the morning or evening hours. It’s also a bit cooler on the prairie than in the city, so we hope folks will come and check us out.”
All events require advance registration on katyprairie.org. Click the “Visit” tab to find “Events.” Participants are encouraged to bring water, cameras, binoculars, and snacks, if desired. For information go to our website or call 713-523-6135. Directions to Inwdiangrass Preserve are also available.
The Katy Prairie Conservancy is a nonprofit land trust dedicated to preserving an ecologically vital tallgrass prairie and associated wetlands area on Houston’s far west side for the enjoyment and benefit of all. You can find us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @katyprairie.

Adults and Children Alike Will Find Entertaining Activities, Including a Bike Ride

HOUSTON (June 29, 2016) – In July, the Katy Prairie Conservancy (KPC) presents two fun events for various age groups, including Unplugged Adventure: Sunset Bike Ride and Ranger Trek: Summer Soundtrack. The Sunset Bike Ride will interest cyclists, while Ranger Trek: Summer Soundtrack focuses on wildlife.

Details include:

Join the Katy Prairie Conservancy for our Unplugged Adventure: Sunset Bike Ride on July 9. Photo courtesy of Katy Prairie Conservancy.
Join the Katy Prairie Conservancy for our Unplugged Adventure: Sunset Bike Ride on July 9. Photo courtesy of Katy Prairie Conservancy.

Unplugged Adventure: Sunset Bike Ride: July 9 from 6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. Bring your bike out for an evening range ride on the historic Warren Ranch. This leisurely ride along ranch roads will be fun for all ages. As the sun goes down, watch the prairie come alive – you might even hear an owl or two. Audience: All Ages. Cost: $5 per person.

During Katy Prairie Conservancy’s Ranger Trek, participants might even see some bees, which are crucial to our eco-system. Photo by Jaime Gonzalez.
During Katy Prairie Conservancy’s Ranger Trek, participants might even see some bees, which are crucial to our eco-system. Photo by Jaime Gonzalez.

Ranger Treks: Summer Soundtrack: July 23 from 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. at Indiangrass Preserve. Join KPC Rangers on a hike of discovery as we explore the sounds and sights of the summer prairie. We’ll be listening for colorful migratory birds, breeding frogs, and melodic katydids. Audience: All ages. Cost: Free.

“We know it’s very hot in July, but that’s no reason not to enjoy our events on the Katy Prairie,” says Mary Anne Piacentini, KPC’s Executive Director. “The activities are for all ages and held in the morning or evening hours. It’s also a bit cooler on the prairie than in the city, so we hope folks will come and check us out.”

All events require advance registration on katyprairie.org. Click the “Visit” tab to find “Events.” Participants are encouraged to bring water, cameras, binoculars, and snacks, if desired. For information go to our website or call 713-523-6135. Directions to Indiangrass Preserve are also available.

The Katy Prairie Conservancy is a nonprofit land trust dedicated to preserving an ecologically vital tallgrass prairie and associated wetlands area on Houston’s far west side for the enjoyment and benefit of all. You can find us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @katyprairie.

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  • katyprairiecons2Saturday, June 4, 2016 from 8:30 am – 11:00 am
    Prairie Work at M.D. Anderson Prairie – 
    We need a group (4-6) of volunteers to help Jaime González cut and transplant grass plugs at the M.D. Anderson Prairie located in the heart of the Texas Medical Center. If you are interested in leading this tour please contact Jaime Gonzalez and he will send you detailed parking and other information.
  • Saturday, June 11, 2016 from 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
    Unplugged Adventure: Nightlife Guides

    KPC needs two volunteer guides to help lead small groups of visitors on an evening hike on the Indiangrass Preserve. Activities will include listening for native amphibians, visiting moth-friendly “sugar stations”, and seeking out signs of nocturnal wildlife. If you are interested in leading this tour please contact Jaime Gonzalez and he’ll be happy to send you more information.

Adults and Children Alike Will Find Entertaining Nature Activities

IKPC Boy Summer Science Nights_Courtesy Katy Prairie Conservancyn June, the Katy Prairie Conservancy (KPC) presents three different Summer Science Nights geared toward students and the Unplugged Adventure Nightlife for all ages. All will take place at the Indiangrass Preserve on the Katy Prairie.

Summer Science Nights are a great way to enrich your child’s understanding of science in the best laboratory of all — the great outdoors. Each session includes hands-on, minds-on activities and a hike on one of KPC’s wildlife-rich preserves.

Sign up for one, two or all three June classes. The series repeats in July. Each class runs from 6 p.m. – 8 p.m.

Details include:

Summer Science Night: Pioneering: June 8. Do you have what it takes to survive as a prairie pioneer? The people who first settled this area were tough, well prepared, and inventive. Come learn how they survived, and try your hand at a few pioneer survival skills. Audience: Children ages 5 – 8. Cost: $7 per child.

Summer Science Night: Frog Hunters: June 15. Summer nights are filled with honks, squeaks, trills, and bellowing calls – all from local frogs. Come learn how to identify frog calls, learn how frogs find and catch prey, and visit a frog-filled wetland on this Summer Science Night adventure. Audience: Children ages 5 – 8. Cost: $7 per child.

Summer Science Night: Buzz on Bees: June 29. Bees are one of nature’s most industrious and fascinating animals. Learn about all the different native bees in our area, how they communicate, and how you can help support them in your own yard. Audience: Children ages 5 – 8. Cost: $7 per child.

Guests might see a beautiful sunset and birds at night during Unplugged Adventure: Nightlife on the Katy Prairie. Photo courtesy Katy Prairie Conservancy.
Guests might see a beautiful sunset and birds at night during Unplugged Adventure: Nightlife on the Katy Prairie. Photo courtesy Katy Prairie Conservancy.

Unplugged Adventure: Nightlife: June 11 from 7 p.m. – 9 p.m. on the Indiangrass Preserve. Nighttime on the prairie is full of clicks, chirps, buzzes, and croaks. It’s a virtual symphony of sounds, alive with beautiful moths, fireflies, and night hunting birds. Join us for an adventurous expedition into the night prairie and learn what goes bump in the night. Audience: All Ages. Cost: $5 per person.

“We hope parents will take advantage of the marvelous Summer Science Nights for younger children,” says Mary Anne Piacentini, KPC’s executive director. “This is one of our most popular programs, so we encourage folks to register early.”

“Continue the learning experience into the summer out on the Katy Prairie, where surprises and adventures await,” adds Piacentini. “Our Unplugged Adventure: Nightlife on June 11 is also open to children and adults of all ages.”

All events require advance registration on katyprairie.org. Click the “Visit” tab to find “Events.” Participants are encouraged to bring water, cameras, binoculars, and snacks, if desired. For information go to our website or call 713-523-6135. Directions to Indiangrass Preserve are also available.

The Katy Prairie Conservancy is a nonprofit land trust dedicated to preserving an ecologically vital tallgrass prairie and associated wetlands area on Houston’s far west side for the enjoyment and benefit of all. You can find us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @katyprairie.

 

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Adults and Children Alike Will Find Entertaining Nature Activities

Frogs are one of the many types of wildlife found on the Katy Prairie. Check out Katy Prairie Conservancy’s April events – Ranger Trek and two Wildlife Workshops, where you should see lots of flora and fauna. Photo by Mac Womack.
Frogs are one of the many types of wildlife found on the Katy Prairie. Check out Katy Prairie Conservancy’s April events – Ranger Trek and two Wildlife Workshops, where you should see lots of flora and fauna. Photo by Mac Womack.

HOUSTON (March 30, 2016) – The Katy Prairie Conservancy (KPC) presents April nature activities Ranger Trek: It’s A Spring Thing and Unplugged Adventure: Wildlife Workshop, which offers both day and night time classes. Adults only are invited to attend the Ranger Trek on April 9, while the two Unplugged Adventure events on April 30 are for all ages. Details include:

Ranger Trek: It’s A Spring Thing: Saturday, April 9 from 9 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. at Indiangrass Preserve. Join KPC Rangers on a hike of discovery as we explore the vibrant life of the spring prairie, including colorful migratory birds and Texas wildflowers. Audience: Adult Learners. Cost: Free.

Unplugged Adventure: Wildlife Workshop: Saturday, April 30 from 7:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. – 9 p.m. at Indiangrass Preserve. This first-of-a-kind workshop designed for novice to intermediate naturalists will provide identification tips for a variety of prairie wildlife and will also give keen insight into wildlife behavior, migration, and more.

Day Session Workshop Instructors: Bob Honig (birds) with Wally Ward and Michael Eckenfels (pollinators). Night Session Workshop Instructors: Dr. Cassidy Johnson (amphibians) and Dr. Amy Bickham Bird (mammals). Audience: All Ages. Cost: $35 per person, which includes lunch (day session) or dinner (night session), plus a T-shirt.

“We hope adults and children alike will check out our brand new Wildlife Workshop on April 30,” says Christine Mansfield, KPC’s community outreach manager. “You get your pick of a day or night time event with outstanding instructors who will make it fun and educational at the same time. Spring is one of the best times of the year to visit the prairie, so we encourage folks to check out either It’s a Spring Thing or one of the Wildlife Workshops, or both.”

The events require advance registration on katyprairie.org. Click the “Visit” tab to find “Events.” Walking shoes, clothing layers, gloves and a hat are recommended, since the prairie tends to be chillier and windier than an urban setting. Participants are also encouraged to bring water, cameras, binoculars and snacks, if desired. For information go to our website or call 713-523-6135. Directions to Indiangrass Preserve are also available.

The Katy Prairie Conservancy is a nonprofit land trust dedicated to preserving an ecologically vital tallgrass prairie and associated wetlands area on Houston’s far west side for the enjoyment and benefit of all. You can find us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @katyprairie.

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Rice, University of Houston and University of St. Thomas to Raise Funds for Pocket Prairies

Monarch Butterfly _Christine Mansfield Photo
The pocket prairies being constructed at Rice University, the University of Houston and the University of St. Thomas will provide habitat for monarch butterflies and other wildlife. Photo by Christine Mansfield.

HOUSTON (February 17, 2016) – The Katy Prairie Conservancy (KPC) has joined with Rice University, the University of Houston (UH) and the University of St. Thomas (UST) through the Grassroots for Change Challenge to build pocket prairies for monarch butterfly habitat on each campus. This is an extension of KPC’s highly successful Prairie Builder Schools & Parks initiative.

The Grassroots for Change Challenge is a friendly competition to raise funds to transform parts of each of these local university campuses into vibrant pocket prairies which will provide excellent habitat for pollinators (such as critical monarch butterflies and native bees), serve as a living laboratory for student research, and give campus visitors, students, and faculty a better sense of Houston and its rich history. Specifically, the focus is on the restoration of the Rice Gully Natural Area at Rice University, construction of the new Shasta Prairie at UH on April 23 to culminate Earth Week 2016, and the transformation of an empty lot at UST into a living, breathing laboratory for undergraduates.

“The Katy Prairie Conservancy brings prairies to urban settings with our Prairie Builders Schools & Parks program,” says Jaime González, KPC’s Conservation Education Director. “This multi-year effort to establish pocket prairies on school grounds and in public parks for the benefit of visitors, students, and wildlife has been transformational for all involved.”

González noted that the Challenge is also about engaging, inspiring, and connecting students at Rice, UH and UST to assist one another in the mission of creating more sustainable and beautiful landscapes on their campuses. Each school’s alumni, students, professors, and supporters are being challenged to help raise the funds needed to create these new pocket prairies for monarch butterflies and other native wildlife.

As part of the friendly competition, KPC will track how much each school’s community has raised for the challenge and will be posting the results online at www.crowdrise.com/grassrootsforchange. Funds raised by each school will be directed toward the pocket prairie on their campus. Yet, in the true spirit of collegiality, KPC encourages cooperation among students from each university to assist one another in the establishment of each pocket prairie.

As a nonprofit land trust, the Katy Prairie Conservancy works to protect greenspace for its conservation and recreational benefits, enhance wildlife habitat, restore tallgrass prairie and wetlands, sponsor scientific research, and offer public programming and activities to introduce the general and school-aged public to the sights and sounds of the prairie. The Katy Prairie is a part of the highly imperiled coastal prairie ecosystem of Texas and Louisiana. You can find us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @katyprairie.

 

HOUSTON (February 4, 2016) –The Katy Prairie Conservancy (KPC) presents three birding events in February, including Coming Home to Roost on February 17 and February 24 and Wild West Tour: Photographing Waterfowl of the Prairie, led by Master Naturalist Glenn Olsen, on February 27. Both are for adult learners.

Guests at Coming Home to Roost should see these sandhill cranes come to roost during the evening on the Katy Prairie. Photo by Mac Womack.
Guests at Coming Home to Roost should see these sandhill cranes come to roost during the evening on the Katy Prairie. Photo by Mac Womack.

Coming Home to Roost: Wednesday, February 17 and Wednesday, February 24, 5:30 p.m. – 6:45 p.m. at Mary Manor Preserve. Each winter the Katy Prairie becomes home to flocks of birds fleeing cooler climates for the season. Join KPC board of directors’ member Steve Gast to see one of the most charismatic of these species, the sandhill crane, as it comes in to roost on the prairie for the evening. The cost is $5 per person, and spaces are limited. You must register for each class separately.

Northern shovelers, a type of duck, might be seen on the Katy Prairie during the Wild West Tour: Photographing Waterfowl of the Prairie. Photo by Mac Womack.
Northern shovelers, a type of duck, might be seen on the Katy Prairie during the Wild West Tour: Photographing Waterfowl of the Prairie. Photo by Mac Womack.

Wild West Tour: Photographing Waterfowl of the Prairie:  Saturday, February 27, 1 pm. – 5 p.m. beginning at Indiangrass Preserve. The Katy Prairie is one of the best places to photograph birds, especially waterfowl in the wintertime. Join bird expert and photographer Glenn Olsen as he visits some of KPC’s preserves to take photos of the prairie’s winter residents. Guests will bring their own cameras to this freehand photography class in which no blinds are used. The cost is $50 per person, and part of this fee goes toward supporting KPC’s educational programming.

“Birders of all levels and interests are invited to come out to the Katy Prairie for one of our bird-related events this month,” says Christine Mansfield, KPC’s Community Outreach Manager. “These are perfect for the amateur photographer who has a strong interest in nature photography. The Katy Prairie is home to more than 300 species of birds, and winter is an ideal time to see many of them.”

The events require advance registration on katyprairie.org by clicking the “Visit” tab to find “Events.” Walking shoes, clothing layers, gloves and a hat are recommended, since the prairie tends to be chillier and windier than an urban setting. Participants are also encouraged to bring water, cameras, binoculars, and snacks, if desired. For information go to our website or call 713-523-6135. Directions to Indiangrass Preserve are also available.

The Katy Prairie Conservancy is a nonprofit land trust dedicated to preserving an ecologically vital tallgrass prairie and associated wetlands area on Houston’s far west side for the enjoyment and benefit of all. You can find us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @katyprairie.

KPC Restoration in Progress Sign_Lajla White
The Indiangrass Preserve, under the leadership of the Katy Prairie Conservancy, is undergoing restoration to improve the quality of this important area of the Katy Prairie. Photo by Lajla White.

The Katy Prairie Conservancy (KPC) continues its winter programming, with an eye on spring, as it presents two nature events in February – Ranger Trek: Rebuilding Paradise and Unplugged Adventure: Promise of Spring. The two events will begin at KPC’s Indiangrass Preserve, 31950 Hebert Road in Waller. They include:
Ranger Trek: Rebuilding Paradise: Saturday, February 13, 10 a.m. – 11 a.m. The Indiangrass Preserve restoration is a demonstration of KPC’s commitment to improving the quality of its preserves for wildlife and for humans too. Come out and learn how this ground-breaking work is being done, take a hike on the newly restored Indiangrass Preserve, and help pot up a few new plants for the restoration effort.
Cost: Free. Audience: Adult Learners.

2.These are seedlings from the Native Seed Nursery on Katy Prairie Conservancy’s Indiangrass Preserve.  Photo by Christine Mansfield.
These are seedlings from the Native Seed Nursery on Katy Prairie Conservancy’s Indiangrass Preserve. Photo by Christine Mansfield.

Unplugged Adventure: Promise of Spring: Saturday, February 27, 10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Spring is right around the corner, and now is the perfect time to learn how you can prepare your yard for a productive, green season. Participants will take a fun hike looking for signs of spring, do a take-home activity in our Native Seed Nursery, and talk about how you can prepare your yard for your wild neighbors.
Cost: $5. Audience: All Ages.

“We invite people all over the Houston area to check out the Katy Prairie with one or both of our February activities, where you can see first-hand how the Indiangrass Preserve is being restored and improved,” says Christine Mansfield, KPC’s Community Outreach Manager. “With Ranger Trek, you can do a good deed for nature and for our Unplugged Adventure, guests will learn how their yards can be transformed for wildlife.”

 

The events require advance registration on katyprairie.org by clicking the “Visit” tab to find “Events.” Walking shoes, clothing layers, gloves and a hat are recommended, since the prairie tends to be chillier and windier than an urban setting. Participants are also encouraged to bring water, cameras, binoculars, and snacks, if desired. For information go to our website or call 713-523-6135. Directions to Indiangrass Preserve are also available.

The Katy Prairie Conservancy is a nonprofit land trust dedicated to preserving an ecologically vital tallgrass prairie and associated wetlands area on Houston’s far west side for the enjoyment and benefit of all. You can find us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @katyprairie.