Coastal Essence – Photography Exhibit by Jim Olive

This photo of Buffalo Bayou at dawn in the area targeted for destruction and “restoration” by the Harris County Flood Control District is on display in the Coastal Essence Fotofest exhibit through May 8 at the Houston Museum of Natural Science in Sugar Land, Texas. Photo taken by Jim Olive on Dec. 9, 2014, from the bluffs of Memorial Park looking downstream towards the bank of the River Oaks Country Club

This photo of Buffalo Bayou at dawn in the area targeted for destruction and “restoration” by the Harris County Flood Control District is on display in the Coastal Essence Fotofest exhibit through May 8 at the Houston Museum of Natural Science in Sugar Land, Texas. Photo taken by Jim Olive on Dec. 9, 2014, from the bluffs of Memorial Park looking downstream towards the bank of the River Oaks Country Club

Contemporary Art Museum Fort Bend is pleased to announce their participation in this year’s biennial FotoFest. This year’s theme, Changing Circumstances: Looking at the Future of the Planet, features an array of breathtaking and intellectual work that offers important commentary on our world and its rapid evolution. Much of the artwork in the exhibitions of FotoFest center in the themes of science, philosophy, politics, and environmental issues along with other global topics.

In the exhibition, Coastal Essence, internationally known photographer Jim Olive delves into the complex world of protecting delicate habitats in our area. The well-known idiom, A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words, first appeared in English publications in the early 1900s. The statement was true then, but has never been truer than today. Everywhere we click on the internet and social media, we are bombarded with images. The high demand for photographic content in almost every form of present day media is relentless. Oftentimes, we learn an entire news story from a couple of images. For environmental organizations needing to express a compelling idea, nothing succeeds like a great picture.

This exhibit by Houston-based photographer Jim Olive demonstrates how local environmental organizations have used photographs to illustrate their cause in both print and social media. Many of the photographs point to specific environmental problems, capture the delicacy of the landscape, and underscore the need for protection of sensitive habitats. “Bottom line, environmental organizations must get the word out of what they do”, states Olive. “Nothing will spread their word faster than a photograph that grabs attention.”

How do environmental and conservation organizations get their message across? By showing the public photographs of what they are trying to protect. That is what Houston-based, internationally-known photographer Jim Olive has been doing for Save Buffalo Bayou and many other conservation organizations. Without Jim’s stunning photos of the historic natural stretch of the bayou flowing past Memorial Park, far fewer people would have any idea of the rare and valuable treasure we have running right through the middle of Houston.

A Fotofest 2016 exhibition titled Coastal Essence features Jim Olive’s photographs that have been used by local environmental organizations to illustrate their cause in print and social media. The exhibition is on display at the Houston Museum of Natural Science located at 13016 University Blvd, Sugar Land, Texas. The show runs through May 8, 2016 at the museum.

This photo of Buffalo Bayou at dawn in the area targeted for destruction and “restoration” by the Harris County Flood Control District is on display in the Coastal Essence Fotofest exhibit through May 8 at the Houston Museum of Natural Science in Sugar Land, Texas. Photo taken by Jim Olive on Dec. 9, 2014, from the bluffs of Memorial Park looking downstream towards the bank of the River Oaks Country Club.

The KCAM Contemporary Art Museum Fort Bend is collaborating with the Houston Museum of Natural Science in Sugar Land for the first time through this year’s Fotofest Biennial, “Changing Circumstances, Looking at the Future of the Planet”. Thanks to the Fort Bend Culture Alliance the museums in this county are trying to work together from time to time in ways that help promote collaboration and community and to help reach a wider public.

“The talented Houston artist Jim Olive has worked with both museums through the years and was an obvious choice for this year’s biennial theme…”, states KCAM Museum Director and Curator Ana Villaronga-Roman. “…Olive has dedicated his life to the betterment of our coast and bays. Through his artistic lens, he captures what is wrong and what needs to be saved, improved or fixed. This exhibition Coastal Essence brings art, the environment, nature and science together thus making it a wonderful opportunity for an art museum to partner with a science museum and reach every corner of Fort Bend County. Once this exhibition ends it will move to The KCAM for a second chance for those in the northern part of the county to enjoy and learn.”

Ana Villaronga-Roman is both the chair of the Fort Bend Culture Alliance and the curator/director of The KCAM. All museums in Fort Bend County are members of the FBCA and their executive directors are on the alliance’s board of directors. The FBCA would like to thank the City of Sugar Land for facilitating this year’s biennial of photography. For more information on the FBCA please visit: www.fortbendculture.com

ABOUT JIM OLIVE, PHOTOGRAPHER

Jim Olive has been photographing wildlife and commercial assignments for over 50 years for corporate clients, non-profits and editorial publications like Texas Parks & Wildlife Magazine, Time-Life, Texas Fish & Game and numerous others. He was also selected to photograph the environment for the EPA Project Documerica. A wildlife biologist by education, he is the founder and executive director of the Christmas Bay Foundation whose mission is to protect and preserve the Texas coastal estuary system.

ABOUT The Houston Museum of Natural Science at Sugar Land

On Oct. 3, 2009, a historic prison building in the residential community area of Telfair opened to the public, transformed – as the new Houston Museum of Natural Science at Sugar Land. This satellite facility of HMNS includes five permanent galleries reflecting the most popular exhibit areas of the downtown Museum location. In addition to permanent exhibitions, the 43,000 square foot building and the surrounding 5.5 acres of land that house the museum present a variety of compelling traveling exhibitions. Located at 13019 University Blvd. (at the corner of University and New Territory Blvds.), a visit to HMNS at Sugar Land is always an adventure.

ABOUT THE KCAM – CONTEMPORARY ART MUSEUM FORT BEND

Established in 2013, the KCAM is a not-for-profit institution in Katy / Fort Bend, Texas, dedicated to presenting the contemporary art of our time to the public. The KCAM provides an interchange for visual arts of the present and recent past, presents new directions in art, strives to engage the public and encourages a greater understanding of contemporary art through education programs. The KCAM occupies a white concrete building in the heart of Katy’s Museum District. The prominent and recognizable building was originally designed and built for the Ray Woods Lumber and Supply Company in 1953 and later housed several other businesses. This building is supposed to have been the very first poured concrete building built in Texas. We are located on the corner of Avenue B and First Street in downtown Katy – right across from the Katy Railroad Park and Tourist Center. Admission is $2.

HISTORY:

In 2011 the Katy Culture & Arts Alliance was established by a group originally called the Katy Cultural Council. This alliance was founded to provide the fast growing Katy area with an umbrella organization for the arts. All members of this original council became the alliance’s first board of directors. Two years of art events and exhibitions for the Katy area and a growing membership convinced many that a permanent exhibition space was important to the growing community and that art education was vital to cultural development. The availability of the 805 Avenue B building was the best option because of its prime location, immediately across from the Katy’s Railroad Park Museum and Tourist Center, with a recognizable design and mid-century modern look, and with easy access to Interstate 10. Our mission is making tomorrow’s history by bringing fundamental cultural change, inspirational aspirations and ideals to the Katy and Fort Bend areas, leaving a legacy of social and cultural transformation.

POPULATION SERVED:

The KCAM serves a large area and population which includes but is not limited to: Fort Bend County and its many cities, West Houston and Harris County, Waller County and Austin County. KCAM is a private museum supported almost entirely and thanks to memberships and donations. Less than 7% of its funding comes from governmental entities. These government funds are pulled from monies raised through county charitable fundraisers and city hotel occupancy taxes designated for the arts. The KCAM is in Fort Bend County and is its only art museum. For more information about KCAM – Contemporary Art Museum Fort Bend, please visit: www.katycam.com